companion planting: fact or folklore

In recent years [and for generations among indigenous populations], companion planting has emerged as a common technique aimed at exploiting the benefits of the relationships between specific plants to naturally improve crop flavor, health, and vigor. More simply, companion planting is a type of polyculture where two plant species are grown together because it is …

alternative food networks and new peasantry

There has arguably been a “relentless assault” on small farming throughout the world as a result of neoliberal policy that has enabled the globalization and industrialization of food production. Corporate regimes have been able to gain a stronghold over agricultural markets, which undermines local stewardship, dispossess rural inhabitants, and depresses both wages and prices via …

the difference between z-farming [zero acreage] and urban agriculture

The mass migration of people from rural to urban spaces throughout the world has brought a number of benefits and challenges. Economic opportunities and exposure to new cultures and experiences have provided people with the chance to lead more diverse lives and expand ties of communication. However, the burgeoning urban populations remain highly dependent on …

the difference between intercropping and companion planting

In nearly all healthy ecosystems, there is an intricate network of living organisms that coexist and provide balance to the environment. Modern approaches to agriculture counter this balance and embrace monoculture production. Within monoculture systems, there is only one type of crop which opens the crop to a number of problems, like pest infestations or …

the dangers of industrial agriculture

It is commonly argued that industrial agriculture is a necessary evil in the world. Proponents contend that industrial agriculture's efficiency and ability to produce huge quantities of products using less space are pivotal to feeding hungry nations throughout the world. Others believe that industrial agriculture has freed poor, rural citizens from their 'backward country ways' …

the benefits of urban agriculture

Agriculture has been a part of urban spaces since man began establishing towns and cities. However, as populations grew, agriculture needed to be outsourced to rural or urban spaces to meet the growing demand of urban citizens. While it may still be necessary to produce more calorie-dense and space-intensive crops, e.g. grains and trees, growing …

what is urban agriculture? how does urban agriculture impact urban communities?

For a municipality to be considered urban, it must be located be in or around a city. Such locations are typically developed or in the process of development meaning that human infrastructure [e.g. houses, commercial buildings, roads, and bridges] are spaced at a minimum density. The number of inhabitants ranges from 2,000 to over 10 …