geoengineering explained: the benefits and challenges of afforestation

Afforestation is the process of planting trees, or sowing seeds, in a barren land devoid of any trees to create a forest. The term should not be confused with reforestation, which is the process of specifically planting native trees into a forest that has decreasing numbers of trees. The increased number of trees helps to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide. Accordingly, this form of geoengineering is considered carbon dioxide removal (CDR).

BENEFITS

CHALLENGES

  • Improves ground water quality
  • Increases the supply of timber and charcoal
  • Provides employment
  • Creates new wildlife habitats
  • Visually attractive
  • Stabilizes river banks and prevents flooding
  • Reduces soil erosion
  • Real opportunity costs – the land used for afforestation will not be available for other uses, such as housing and food production
  • Must be applied on a global scale to have a significant impact

see also:

Question: What is geoengineering?

Albedo Enhancement

Space Reflectors
Stratospheric Aerosols

Afforestation
Ambient Air Capture
Biochar
Bioenergy Capture and Sequestration
Ocean Fertilization
Enhanced Weathering
Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement

sources:

Gupta, A. (2010, October 18). Afforestation: Meaning, Importance and Current Efforts. Retrieved from Bright Hub: http://www.brighthub.com/environment/science-environmental/articles/91133.aspx
Economist. (2012, July 19). Advantages and Disadvantages of Afforestation. Retrieved from Infobarrel: http://www.infobarrel.com/Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Afforestation

Author: thesunshineisours

Hi! I'm Millie. I'm a too analytical, door-holding, garden-obsessed, food-loving, sarcastic agricultural genius in training. I cry too much, laugh out loud when I probably shouldn't and hope to make the world a better place by improving our relationship with food.

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